Two problems I see prevalent in American Society

In the question of how wide should the scope of the Federal Government be, I believe the answer is no, it should not be as wide as it is today and that big government is not necessary nor wanted in American society. I am a firm believer in the ideals of individualism which is the idea of being self reliant rather than its more socialist counterpart being collectivism. However there are definitely many flaws in America today that are doing more harm to not only the nation, but people’s individual freedoms. Two of which I believe to be social security and healthcare.

 

To begin, Social Security is definitely not needed. Why should the government have control of my retirement and the money I make monthly? Of course, how are we as a society supposed to plan for our futures if people do not know how to set up retirement, but I see Social Security as the problem that caused this in the first place. Also take into consideration the extra money people would have to invest into the economy, which in turn boost it. 

 

However, Social Security is not the only unnecessary reform in America. Another example would be healthcare, or to be more specific, governmental healthcare. Like Social Security I believe that, as harsh as it may seem, it is not the government job to take care of individuals. Same can be said about welfare programs as it also is some sort of government aid. Yes, nations like Canada have free healthcare, but for the United States it can’t be sustained. 

 

What about the idea of collectivism itself and why is that such a harm to the great nation that is the United States? Well collectivism is the idea that disregards the individual in favor of the group aka the collective. If America were to turn to more of a collective approach it would ruin American values in favor of more socialist and radical views; however, I digress. These are only some of many examples of why the government having as much power as they do is a hindrance to American values and ideals.