More Problems for the Boeing 737

More Problems for the Boeing 737

 

On March 13, 2019, all of the Boeing 737 Max 8 air crafts were grounded after two fatal crashes killed a total of 346 people. The first crash happened in October of 2018. The Lion Air Flight 610 crashes minutes after takeoff, killing 189 people. The second occurred in March of 2019. This was the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, which similarly crashed minutes after takeoff, killing all 157 people on board. As a response, all Max flights were temporarily grounded for investigation. Since the grounding of all 737 Max 8 planes, Boeing has been working on updating software and other systems. It is taking much longer than expected and it is not clear when they will begin flying again. 

 

Many agencies, like the Joint Authorities Technical Review, the National Transportation Safety Board, Justice Board, and others investigated the cause of the crashes. Evidence gathered from the black boxes from both planes shows that the crashes were caused by a malfunction in the system designed to stop the plane from stalling. In most recent news in their investigations, it was discovered that Boeing employees were aware of problems in the 737 Max 8, yet failed to inform the FAA, and according to recently released documents, employees were aware of problems with flight simulators. Boeing insisted that these statements made by employees were false and that the flight simulators work properly.

 

Boeing also faces issues with another model of the 737. The 737-800, also known as the New Generation, faced problems in 2018 when parts of the engine hit the side of the plane, causing a fan blade to break off and shatter a window. This depressurized the cabin and the woman sitting next to that window was killed. The 737 NG has also had problems with cracks on the structural supports that support the wings of the plane. As of now, most of the 737 NGs continue to fly.

 

With all that is happening, questions are being raised about the safety of the 737 aircrafts, as well as Boeing itself. Many people believe that the company values profit over safety. Chairman of the House Transportation Committee Rep. Peter DeFazio said that the employees of Boeing “paint a deeply disturbing picture of the lengths Boeing was apparently willing to go to in order to evade scrutiny from regulators, flight crews, and the flying public, even as its own employees were sounding alarms internally.” As a result of recent events, there is no doubt that Boeing will have a hard time gaining back trust from the public.